Tag: Character

lonely goblin

I picked up Lonely Shining Goblin and Legend of the Deep Blue Sea at the same time, but only Goblin felt truly inventive.  It was brooding and patient (occasionally too much so), and Lee Dong Wook’s grim reaper was reminiscent of another drama I liked, although it didn’t quite reach its potential, Blade Man.

For me, the best thing about this drama is the mood.

The-Lonely-Shining-Goblin-sword-in-chest.jpg

SPOILERS AHEAD

Highlighting Lee Dong Wook as an actor isn’t to imply that it wasn’t great to spend time with Gong Yoo on the small screen again, but as much as I hate to say so, Gong Yoo’s gravitas may have overgrown the TV medium.   Although he did well embody the longing one might expect from a goblin who had brooded for 500 years, reflecting on tragedy and injustice, suffering without intimacies.

Yet having seen him in films like A Man and a Woman, I couldn’t shake the feeling that a mature partner for him would have been more appealing.

Kim Go-Eun did move my heart in scenes, even out-shining her more seasoned costars.  Especially, her capacity for anguish was startling for one so young.  But the ultra light-and-girly way her character was written didn’t allow for deep enough chemistry between the two.  By contrast, her Cheese in the Trap character held to a grounded center.  I much preferred her there.

Overall, I was pleased with facets of time and memory, overlap and questioning of identities, virtue and vice, even though some connections weren’t quite made.  Long episodes were appropriate, fitting to the desired epic scale.

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Hard Pill

[Spoilers, Cheese in the Trap re-watch: episodes 13 – 16 (Final)]    CiTT posts in order 

I’m not sure when this turned into recaps when I never meant to do such a thing, but it has been a good tool to work through unarticulated impressions, with distance from the first viewing.

I’m not going to go through all the scenes that get us to the high and low points of the next few episodes, which in many ways felt flimsy.  Basically, there are a number of ‘testing’ situations… Seol setting limits, Jung defaulting to usual patterns, and Seol dealing with In Ho’s now openly expressed feelings.

Ready to be dropped off a cliff?

Me neither but here we go.

Continue reading “Hard Pill”

As You Are, if You Know

[Spoilers: Cheese in the Trap – re-watch, episode 12]

CiTT posts in order.

Episode 12 is actually another worthy of its own attention. I see it as the flip side of 11, where Seol’s vulnerability and anger surfaces, and she finds comfort in Jung, who then matches her in kind. Both are achingly raw with each other, but tested too soon. Jung closes abruptly, hurt mostly by his own unfamiliar openness.  

Having seen both Jung’s warmth and coldness in play, perhaps Seol feels she can talk him through what she is coming to know about expression and ‘prevention’. He can be genuine and warm with her; can he also be honest? Can she risk being honest with him too, about all the ‘little things’ she is afraid will hit his many triggers?

What will it take to maneuver this minefield together?
Continue reading “As You Are, if You Know”

Who Exactly, Are You?

[Spoilers for re-watch, episodes 8, 9, 10]

CiTT in order.

It might have worked a number of ways, actually. Here in the middle episodes we may have been able to shift away from Jung/Seol for a while, and to consider In Ho/Seol. We could have been honestly torn, and come to accept a change of heart, or have backed up enough from both to see them growing up in parallel through unique challenges.

However, for In Ho to supplant Jung in Seol’s affections, the writer would have had to start solving Jung for us in another way by now…

watching-video

Continue reading “Who Exactly, Are You?”

Of His Own

[Spoilers for re-watch of episodes 5 (cont.) – 6]

CiTT in order.

With Jung and Seol, things develop slowly. Although he has dated far more, and, as In Ho tells Seol, broken the hearts of “trucks of women”, with Eun Seol Jung finds an innocence he knows is precious and tries to protect that.

trucks-of-women

Episode 6 holds one of the most tender scenes in the drama if you’re on Jung’s side, because while at Seol’s house, comfortable and curious, he easily begins to share the core of struggle that for everyone else is a lock box mystery. Trust between them becomes much easier.

his-heart

Still trying to make sense of his change toward her, and to make peace with earlier instincts and events, Seol also seizes the openness to ask, when that happened. We get to see the way he came to understand her walls as like his own, began to recognize her kindness and sense of personal responsibility, so important to Jung who has been groomed not to complain when taken advantage of… always to do and give more, to let things be taken, since he has so much.                         Continue reading “Of His Own”